Category: Ink Swabs

Ink Swab: Vinta Bodabil (Harlequin)

I recently received a sample vial of Vinta’s new ink called Bodabil or Harlequin. Apparently it’s not part of a new collection, which I heard is already in the works (yaaaay!). Anyway, Bodabil is a fun purple ink with green sheen. I used a Lamy Safari Dark Lilac with an F nib for the writing sample above and at first it looked really dark, almost black. The purple color shows up more prominently after it dries. Like their popular sheening inks (Dugong Bughaw, Sandugo, etc), this one has a very pronounced sheen. I really like the combination of purple and green.

The flow of the ink is a little bit wetter than moderate. I’d say it has a good flow and has no problems with clogging up even my fine nibbed Lamy. There’s minimal shading, though you can see that the darker parts are almost black in color. Some of the red component of the ink can also be more pronounced in some spots. I used it with my Lamy Studio with a 1.5mm nib and the shading and sheen is even more beautiful. It’s pretty on photos but I think it’s even prettier in person.

Using a fine nib, it dries up after about 20 seconds, which isn’t bad for a sheening ink. It’s also not waterproof. People who like using fountain pen ink with water will find this ink quite delightful because it washes to a generous purple while leaving a bit of outline on the paper.

Overall, it’s a rich purple ink that’s flows well and is easy to read. Suitable for daily use or for art journal entries. I think it’s a great addition to the Vinta Inks family. Here are more close up photos of the writing sample: Continue reading “Ink Swab: Vinta Bodabil (Harlequin)”

Sneak Peek: Inks by Vinta, Collection 2

I received a few sample vials of Vinta’s second collection of inks last week. These are mostly pastels so they’re pretty interesting because I don’t really have similar inks in my collection. I haven’t really used them a lot because I just got them, but I did some swabs and writing samples using a glass pen. A few of them, I’ve tried with fountain pens. More on those when I write reviews about them later.

A general observation, many of these ink colors are very subtle. To coax out the uniqueness of their colors, it’s best to use wet-writing mediums, broads, stubs, or flexies. From my observation, those that can be used with fine and mediums are: Lucia, Maskara, Carnival, Armada, Piloncitos, Sirena and Kanlaon. Those that work better with wider and wetter nibs are Hanan, Perya, Julio, and Julia.

My favorites are Lucia, Maskara, and Julio. Sirena and Armada are close contenders. Two colors aren’t really pastel so they kinda broke the pattern; Piloncitos and Kanlaon. The shimmer on these two are just absolutely crazy. I’ll write individual reviews as time permits.

These should be available for preorder in a couple of weeks, according to Jillian of Inks by Vinta.

Ink Swab: La Paz by Vinta Inks

Next up on my reviews on Inks by Vinta is La Paz 1985 (Bronze Yellow). I think that’s a very apt name for it; bronze yellow. It’s surprising how yellow inks can look beautiful on a page and that they can be used for daily writing. This isn’t a light yellow ink, it actually borders on golden brown. The shading on this ink is beautiful, a closer look at the strokes that the pen makes will show a range of colors from light, earthy yellow to dark brown. When it dries up, it has this sort of chalky finish to it, which makes it quite interesting to use with water.

It’s really fun to wash out and layer. If you’re into using fountain pen ink for your art, you might find that this ink moves a bit differently from other inks. I can’t really explain it well, you need to try it to see what I mean.

The ink dries pretty fast, about 15 seconds or so using a medium nib. The flow is dry to moderate, depending on the nib you use. I think that the color is saturated enough to use for daily writing. It kinda reminds me of the color of honey, or dried leaves without that red component. It’s a very interesting looking ink.

Here are a few closeups of the writing sample:

It doesn’t have sheen or shimmer like most of the other ink in Vinta’s current lineup, but it has a certain charming complexity that makes you look twice.

Vinta Inks are available on their website inksbyvinta.com.

Ink Swab: Sandugo by Vinta Inks

Here’s the only red ink in Vinta’s current lineup. Sandugo 1565 (Sikatuna) is a dark red ink with a golden green sheen. The name is based on Datu Sikatuna and the Spanish explorer Miguel López de Legazpi who made a blood compact, or Sandugo, to seal their friend­ship. The first time I tried this ink, I thought it was black, but after writing more, the red shows through. When the light hits is at an angle, the green sheen just lights everything up. The wetter your nib is, the more it shows off the character of the ink.

It actually reminded me more of cherries. Dark red that’s almost black and a hint of green under the right light. The base color is a nicely saturated red which is light enough to show some shading. Its flow is moderate to wet, and it dries up a bit slow. I think it’s a nice, complex color that’s good for everyday writing.

Here are a few close up shots of the writing sample:

I like how beautiful the sheen on Vinta’s inks look like, and I love that they’re not hard on the nibs at all. Left in my pen for a couple of weeks without using and it didn’t hard start at all.

Vinta Inks are available for purchase within the Philippines. Visit their website here.

Ink Swab: Kosmos by Vinta Inks

Next up in my review of Vinta Inks is Kosmos 1955 (Cosmic Blue). I think that Vinta came out with really beautiful blue inks, but this is my favorite. It’s surprising because I’m not a huge fan of shimmery inks. I think they’re too high maintenance because of the sparkly bits. When I tried the prototypes last year, this was also my favorite of the batch. It’s remarkable that I used it in several pens (stubs, mediums) and I didn’t have any problems with clogging. I like using it with my stubs and (in the photo above) a Waterman Expert II with a left oblique cursive italic nib. The amount of sheen and shimmer is pretty dramatic.

In low light, it looks like blue ink with a pink halo. When light hits it just the right way, all the sparkly bits just light up like stars. it’s so much fun to look at. At first I thought the shimmer is silver but if you take a closer look it looks more like copper. It actually reminded me of Emerald of Chivor because of the combination of sheen, shimmer and shading, but the base color is a beautiful royal blue. It pops right out of the page and is very eye-catching, especially if you use fountain pen friendly paper like tomoe river or mica (which were the two kinds of paper I used for the writing samples in this review).

The flow is moderate, not too wet. It dries pretty fast too, about 10-15 seconds. It also doesn’t smudge when I run my finger over it after it has dried. It’s a great looking ink, and it’s well-saturated enough for daily writing. In low light it looks like a nice, dark blue ink, but then you look closely and it’s so…disco. Me likey.

Here are a few closeups of the writing sample.

It’s such a trippy ink, and I’m happy that it behaves relatively well in my pens, considering the amount of shimmer in it. It’s even more fun to look at in person. The team behind Vinta did a wonderful job on this one.

Check out Vinta Inks’ website for details on Kosmos and other colors.