Tag: j herbin ink

Review: J. Herbin Violette Pensee

J. Herbin Violette Pensee

Here’s another ink sample I got through Everything Calligraphy. J. Herbin’s Violette Pensee (Violet Thought). It’s a nice violet ink with strong blue undertones. In person, the blue component of the ink is a bit less obvious. It’s really more like a muted purple. It’s pretty easy on the eyes, not an extremely vibrant, highly-saturated purple. I took several photos of it but it always looks more ambiguous on photo than in person.

The flow is pretty good, quite wet actually. It takes a good 25-30 seconds when I used it with my Cross Century II, which is one of my wettest medium nib. There’s some shading to it too. Here are a few close ups:

J. Herbin Violette Pensee

J. Herbin Violette Pensee

J. Herbin Violette Pensee

J. Herbin Violette Pensee

J. Herbin Violette Pensee

Not exactly water resistant, though it leaves a very faint blue line behind.

Overall, I would use this for daily writing. There are some shades of purple that I just can’t tolerate because they look a lot like those stamp pad inks in offices. This is a more muted kind of purple. It flows wet, though. Takes a few seconds to dry. People who are in a hurry to take notes might find the dry time too long. Of course that depends on the paper and the nib that you use.

Ink Review: J. Herbin Larmes De Cassis

I got a sample of J. Herbin Larmes De Cassis (Tears of Black Currant) from Everything Calligraphy a couple of weeks ago. I’m not too big on purple or purplish inks, I admit I’m still hung up on Bilberry and J. Herbin┬áPoussiere de Lune but it’s always great to try new ink colors.

My first impression on J. Herbin Larmes De Cassis is that it doesn’t really look like black currant. That would actually be a super cool ink color, though. It looks more like ube.

J. Herbin Larmes De Cassis

It starts out looking light and a bit too timid, but it gets darker as it dries. It’s not a bold purple, but it’s not too soft-looking either. I’m not sure if it’s just because I used it with a stub, but it doesn’t offer too much shading. Some people will like that, but I like my inks very shade-y.

The flow is pretty wet, and it took about 20 seconds for the ink to dry on Tomoe River paper. It’s not an extremely complex-looking ink, there’s no sheen or distinctly ambiguous undertones. It’s just a pretty shade of soft purple. It’s saturated enough to use for daily writing, it’s not hard to read. It’s a well-behaved ink that takes just a tad longer to dry. It’s also not water resistant. It leaves a very faint blue line behind, but most of the color washed away after a 30 second soak.

Here are a few close ups of the writing sample:

J. Herbin Larmes De Cassis

J. Herbin Larmes De Cassis

J. Herbin Larmes De Cassis

J. Herbin Larmes De Cassis

J. Herbin Larmes De Cassis

J. Herbin Larmes De Cassis

J. Herbin Larmes De Cassis

It’s really like writing with liquid ube. Now I’m hungry. Overall, it’s a pleasant purple ink. The kind that grows on you as you use it.

Review: J. Herbin Rouge Opera

Ugh, these little bottle of J. Herbin inks. It’s like little shots of addictive colors. I tried this sample of J. Herbin Rouge Opera and it’s really solidifying my newfound fascination for pink inks. Pink. Me? Imagine that. I guess stranger things have happened. But I have a few pink inks in my collection, and I love using them for calligraphy. Anyway, back to Rouge Opera.

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

The name means Opera Red, although the color is more like a warm pink. The writing sample was made on Tomoe River paper. I think that’s a really pleasant-looking pink ink. It’s not so hard to read, and the shading is pretty. It’s the kind of pink that pops out of a page, without looking too loud. It’s a nice, velvety pink that would make a lovely shade for a prom dress. It’s not too sweet-looking, like baby pink. It’s also saturated enough for daily writing, though probably not something you’d use for formal documents. I’d totally love to write personal letters with this ink, though. The creative applications such as pen and wash, and calligraphy are pretty interesting.

The ink is one of the wetter pink inks that I’ve tried. I like the flow, it doesn’t feel so dry and it doesn’t bleed a lot either. It’s a pretty well-behaved ink. The drying time is an average of 15 to 20 seconds in Tomoe River paper with a wet medium nib. There’s not much water resistance to speak of. A 30 second soak left only the faintest pink line behind.

Here are a few close ups of the writing sample.

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

I got this sample of Rouge Opera from Everything Calligraphy.

Review: J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

Here’s another J. Herbin ink I’ve always been curious about but never really tried because I couldn’t imagine using an ink that looked so cheerful. Thanks to Everything Calligraphy, I tried a sample of it out and I’ve been enjoying it for a few days. J. Herbin’s Diablo Menthe is a very minty-looking blue ink. I had to use it with a wet writer just so I can really see its color. I can think of a few creative applications for this, but as far as writing goes, I wouldn’t recommend it for daily writing. Unless, of course, you’re into lightly saturated inks for your daily writing.

As far as writing goes, I think this would be useful for making unobtrusive notes on a page, or to write out section headlines/dividers and provide contrast to darker inks. It’s a pretty nice highlighter ink too. If you use wide nibs for calligraphy, it could be a darker shade of mint blue. It dries pretty fast, an average of 10 to 15 seconds. It’s not water proof at all, I guess that’s pretty easy to see.

The ink flow tends to be dry, depending on the nib that you use. Which is why I think it would make a good highlighter ink. It makes a pretty eye-catching ink for drawings, though. I cannot wait to use it in more pen and ink or pen and wash drawing. Here are a few closeups of the writing sample.

J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

Review: J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

I don’t usually try pale-colored inks but once in a while I do enjoy them too. Here’s a sample that I got from Everything Calligraphy, J. Herbin Rouille de Encre. The name means “rusted anchor” but I’m not sure that’s appropriate for the color. It reminds me more of flower petals. The color is a nice soft color that’s like a cross between peach and pink. It has this chalky, pastel-like appearance that makes it look so inviting on paper.

I don’t think it’s something I can use for everyday writing (like at work), but it would look great in personal letters. Also works great in notes as a contrast to other complementing colors. I can think of a number of great creative applications for it. It’s saturated just enough to be readable and it has some beautiful shading. It dries up at an average of 15 seconds, and the flow is dry to moderate.

As you can see in the photo below, it’s not water resistant at all. It’s a very delicate-looking ink. I would suggest using it with a wet-writing nib, preferably medium/broad/stub.

J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

While it may not be something you can use for everyday applications, it’s pretty darn cute. Here are a few closeups of the writing sample below:

J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

J. Herbin Rouille de Encre