Tag: j herbin

Review: J. Herbin Rouge Opera

Ugh, these little bottle of J. Herbin inks. It’s like little shots of addictive colors. I tried this sample of J. Herbin Rouge Opera and it’s really solidifying my newfound fascination for pink inks. Pink. Me? Imagine that. I guess stranger things have happened. But I have a few pink inks in my collection, and I love using them for calligraphy. Anyway, back to Rouge Opera.

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

The name means Opera Red, although the color is more like a warm pink. The writing sample was made on Tomoe River paper. I think that’s a really pleasant-looking pink ink. It’s not so hard to read, and the shading is pretty. It’s the kind of pink that pops out of a page, without looking too loud. It’s a nice, velvety pink that would make a lovely shade for a prom dress. It’s not too sweet-looking, like baby pink. It’s also saturated enough for daily writing, though probably not something you’d use for formal documents. I’d totally love to write personal letters with this ink, though. The creative applications such as pen and wash, and calligraphy are pretty interesting.

The ink is one of the wetter pink inks that I’ve tried. I like the flow, it doesn’t feel so dry and it doesn’t bleed a lot either. It’s a pretty well-behaved ink. The drying time is an average of 15 to 20 seconds in Tomoe River paper with a wet medium nib. There’s not much water resistance to speak of. A 30 second soak left only the faintest pink line behind.

Here are a few close ups of the writing sample.

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

J. Herbin Rouge Opera

I got this sample of Rouge Opera from Everything Calligraphy.

Review: J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

Here’s another J. Herbin ink I’ve always been curious about but never really tried because I couldn’t imagine using an ink that looked so cheerful. Thanks to Everything Calligraphy, I tried a sample of it out and I’ve been enjoying it for a few days. J. Herbin’s Diablo Menthe is a very minty-looking blue ink. I had to use it with a wet writer just so I can really see its color. I can think of a few creative applications for this, but as far as writing goes, I wouldn’t recommend it for daily writing. Unless, of course, you’re into lightly saturated inks for your daily writing.

As far as writing goes, I think this would be useful for making unobtrusive notes on a page, or to write out section headlines/dividers and provide contrast to darker inks. It’s a pretty nice highlighter ink too. If you use wide nibs for calligraphy, it could be a darker shade of mint blue. It dries pretty fast, an average of 10 to 15 seconds. It’s not water proof at all, I guess that’s pretty easy to see.

The ink flow tends to be dry, depending on the nib that you use. Which is why I think it would make a good highlighter ink. It makes a pretty eye-catching ink for drawings, though. I cannot wait to use it in more pen and ink or pen and wash drawing. Here are a few closeups of the writing sample.

J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

J. Herbin Diablo Menthe

Review: J. Herbin Caroube de Chypre

I was really excited to receive this ink sample of J. Herbin’s Caroube de Chypre from Everything Calligraphy. I think one of my favorite inks is Emerald of Chivor, and I was really excited to find out what a dark brown shimmery ink would look like. I think the thing I loved best about Emerald of Chivor is how lubricated it is. Considering that it’s so shimmery, I’m so happy that it’s a very well-behaved ink. I use it on my more expensive pens, not just in pens that I can easily take apart (like Lamy). J. Herbin really did something right with how they formulated Emerald of Chivor.

That being said, I eagerly tried Caroube de Chypre. The name is based on the color of carob pods, which is said to be a kind of beans that J. Herbin ate and traded during his voyages to Cyprus. The base color is a nicely saturated, warm brown color. It reminded me of De Atramentis Coffee, which is one of my favorite brown inks. It’s also a little similar to Iroshizuku Tsukushi. The shimmery flecks are gold, and there’s some green sheen.

J. Herbin Caroube de Chepyr

Right off the bat I noticed that the gold flecks settled faster at the bottom of the ink bottle than the flecks of Emerald of Chivor. I think that may be the reason that the shimmer is a bit less pronounced. Of course, how you see the shimmer and sheen depends on a lot of factors like how broad and wet your pen’s nib is, the texture and quality of paper you use, even the direction of light as you look at it. I think that for a shimmery ink, this one’s actually pretty conservative-looking. I noticed that the gold flecks appear to be less distributed on paper, perhaps because the particles settle down too quickly? I don’t know. The green sheen only shows up in places where the ink pools more. It’s a lot less pronounced than the red sheen of EoC, which almost seems like a nice red halo around the lines you write. This pronounced red sheen, I think, is the key to why EoC looks beautifully complex.

J. Herbin Caroube de Chypre

That being said, it’s a nicely saturated brown ink that I can definitely use for everyday writing. It flows a bit dryer than EoC, but it is also quite a well-behaved ink. It hasn’t clogged my pen yet after several days of leaving the pen capped. Drying time is an average of 15-20 seconds. It’s also not very water resistant. There’s minimal shading using a medium nib and the green sheen is also not too pronounced. Here are a few close up shots of the writing sample.

J. Herbin Caroube de Chypre

J. Herbin Caroube de Chypre

J. Herbin Caroube de Chypre

J. Herbin Caroube de Chepyr

J. Herbin Caroube de Chypre

Overall, it’s not as crazy-looking as Emerald of Chivor, but it has its own charm. It’s subdued and nicely saturated, and when you lay down a lot of shimmer with the ink, it almost looks like writing with liquid bronze.

Review: J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

I don’t usually try pale-colored inks but once in a while I do enjoy them too. Here’s a sample that I got from Everything Calligraphy, J. Herbin Rouille de Encre. The name means “rusted anchor” but I’m not sure that’s appropriate for the color. It reminds me more of flower petals. The color is a nice soft color that’s like a cross between peach and pink. It has this chalky, pastel-like appearance that makes it look so inviting on paper.

I don’t think it’s something I can use for everyday writing (like at work), but it would look great in personal letters. Also works great in notes as a contrast to other complementing colors. I can think of a number of great creative applications for it. It’s saturated just enough to be readable and it has some beautiful shading. It dries up at an average of 15 seconds, and the flow is dry to moderate.

As you can see in the photo below, it’s not water resistant at all. It’s a very delicate-looking ink. I would suggest using it with a wet-writing nib, preferably medium/broad/stub.

J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

While it may not be something you can use for everyday applications, it’s pretty darn cute. Here are a few closeups of the writing sample below:

J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

J. Herbin Rouille de Encre

Review: J. Herbin Tempest

The nice people at Everything Calligraphy sent over this pen for me to try out and review. It’s called the J. Herbin Tempête or Tempest. Nice name, don’t you think? You can at least say that you’re writing up a storm with Tempest in your hand. It came in a nice velvety-black box, some literature on how to use it, and a little dropper.

J. Herbin Tempest

I would suggest skipping the dropper completely and just using a syringe because the dropper only holds a bit of ink at a time. It looks kinda pretty, though. My first impression of the whole thing was that I liked the shape of the pen. It reminded me of desk pens because of the pointy end. It’s certainly a looker.

J. Herbin Tempest

It’s not a small pen, by any means. It’s a comfortably-sized pen. Uncapped and unposted, it’s about 5.25 inches more or less. Capped, it’s about six inches. It’s not super long, I can post it comfortably enough.

J. Herbin Tempest

I think it’s a pretty handsome pen, and it’s eyecatching because of the shape and because of that clear barrel with the frosted-looking interiors. It was clearly made to be an eyedropper, but I was initially concerned about inking it up and staining it. I’m a little OC about my clear-barreled pens and one of my biggest regrets is turning my Frankling Christoph into an eyedropper (and filling it with Emerald of Chivor). After that fiasco, I decided to only turn opaque-barreled pens to eyedroppers and spare myself the heartache of seeing all that pristine acrylic horribly stained by ink. Other people certainly don’t mind it, I guess it’s a matter of personal preference.

J. Herbin Tempest

Well, I had to ink up the pen so that I could test it. So I half-filled it up with Diamine Wagner. The end of the section threads has this little o-ring in it that I suppose helps with making sure the ink doesn’t leak out. Just be careful when cleaning out the pen that the o-ring doesn’t slip out. Surprisingly, the interior of the pen had this texture that made it resistant to staining.

J. Herbin Tempest

The ink just slides off the surface, making it really easy to wash off. When I cleaned the pen afterwards, I couldn’t see traces of the ink that I used. I guess it may still stain with frequent use and depending on the ink brand and color, but it’s nice to see that it is stain resistant. In any case, I would think that if you buy a pen designed to be an eyedropper, you shouldn’t mind some stains on the barrel.

J. Herbin Tempest

Overall, I did like the look and feel of the pen. It’s a bit too light for my taste, but some people will actually like that. It’s also shiny in all the right places. 🙂 The section is comfortable, but there’s a small gap where the o-ring is. I guess that can’t be helped. I especially liked the design on the nib.

J. Herbin Tempest

I think that’s just pretty. Here are a few more close up shots of other parts of the pen.

J. Herbin Tempest      J. Herbin Tempest

J. Herbin Tempest      J. Herbin Tempest

The ink that I used is a dry ink, but it looked really nice when I tried to write with the pen. I had primed it properly prior to use so it didn’t have a hard time starting. The pen had a pretty nice flow going, despite the fact that I used a dry ink.

J. Herbin Tempest

Here is a video of my writing sample.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1hSn5zEWyA]
I must say that I enjoyed writing with it. Because it’s really light, I wrote several pages without tiring out my hand. It’s a comfortable pen. The nib was smooth enough but could use a bit more tuning. Not something terribly off-putting, though.

Check out Everything Calligraphy for the Tempest.

DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a paid post.

Ink Swab: J. Herbin Emerald of Chivor Review

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Last week I heard that J. Herbin’s new anniversary ink, Emerald of Chivor, has finally arrived in the Philippines. So I asked my favorite Scribe branch to reserve one for me, and I picked it up last Sunday. I’ve been looking forward to this ink for a while, so I was really excited to try it out.

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I only use my bling-y anniversary inks with Lamy pens, but this time I thought I would be adventurous and try it with my Faber Castell Emotion with a medium nib. My first impression (as I waited for the ink to dry and show the sparkly bits), is that the base ink looks gorgeous. It kind of reminds me of Iroshizuku Syo-Ro, but darker. The gold bits on the bottle are also noticeably easier to shake than Stormy Grey. Perhaps the concentration of micronized particles for this color is lower? I’m not sure.

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It is a pretty good-looking shade of blue-green, though. The ink flows really wet. I used it on a medium nib and it definitely flows wetter than other J. Herbin anniversary inks that I’ve tried. This review was written on the loose Tomoe River paper I got from www.pengrafik.com, and I must say…wowza! This combination is amazing. I’ve tried the ink on several different papers and of course, you need to get the right combination of nib and paper in order to bring out the sheen more effectively. On most papers, the micronized gold bits get distributed a bit evenly, making it look almost like colored sandpaper. See the closeup photo below of what it looks like on Mnemosyne’s paper.

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It’s a bit harder to see the micronized gold specks. With Tomoe River paper, though, the sheen is so pronounced. The letters look like they’re glowing reddish gold, and the areas where the ink pools show more of the gorgeous sheen. The wetter the pen is, the more obvious the sheen. Here’s what it looks like with the pen newly inked:

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This was written with my Lamy Safari’s 1.5mm nib. You can see the reddish gold sheen almost covering the dark blue green parts of the ink. The photo below shows my Emotion when it was newly-inked with Emerald of Chivor.

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You can see the reddish gold sheen complements the dark blue green base color so beautifully. It actually reminded me of the color of beetles. I can say that it’s my favorite J. Herbin anniversary ink so far.

Here are a few close ups of the writing sample above.

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The ink flows super wet, so I’m not sure if lefties who are over-writers will have a difficult time with it. It takes between 25 to 30 seconds to dry. Even if it’s nicely-saturated, it’s not very water resistant. It looks awesome when used with calligraphy nibs, such a head turner. It doesn’t hard-start after being left in the pen, unused for over a day. I’ll update this post if I notice any clogging issues when left unused for a few days.

Overall, I really like the base color of this ink. It’s suitable for daily writing. The sheen is spectacular (provided you find the right combination of nib and paper). Takes a long time to dry, but I think that’s alright. Hat tip to J. Herbin for making another wonderful anniversary ink!

Used in this review:
Pens – Faber Castell Emotion (Medium) and Lamy Safari (1.5mm nib)
Papers – Curnow Tomoe River loose paper (from Pengrafik) and Mnemosyne dot grid paper

Ink Swab: J. Herbin’s Cafe Des Iles

Cafe Des Iles001

I picked this color out from Scribe Writing Essentials when I bought the TWSBI Micarta because I wanted a rich brown ink to match the gorgeous color of the pen. I already have J. Herbin’s Lie de The (which is one of my favorites) but I think that the pen called for a darker shade of brown.

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Like so. It’s a moderately wet ink, not too much shading on it but if you’re looking for a rich brown, this is a good bet.

Ink Swab: J. Herbin’s Bleu Myosotis

Bleu Myosotis001

Sigh. I’m only just beginning to explore J. Herbin’s blue inks, but I’m beginning to think that this isn’t working out. This ink started out pretty promising. I inked up my Kaweco ALSport Stonewashed Blue with it and was pretty happy because the color looked like it fits the pen. It was that kind of blue, kind of like stonewashed jeans.

Then as the ink dried up, it became lighter and lighter. Now it’s the color of light lilac.

I don’t suggest you use this for documents (or letters) that you want to last for a long time. I have yet to try a blue J. Herbin ink that I’m happy with. 🙁

Today’s haul: TWSBI Micarta and Two New Ink Bottles

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A trip to Scribe almost always end up the same way; with a haul, big or small. Haha. Today’s haul is awesome, though, because I’ve been waiting for this pen since I ordered it back in late August–the TWSBI Micarta. I ordered one with a clip and medium nib, but I decided that the clipless pen looked better.

I also bought a small bottle of Bleu Myosotis and Cafe Des Iles. It’s always better to buy smaller bottles first so you can see if you like them before you buy big ones. Of course I inked the TWSBI Micarta with Cafe Des Iles, because who doesn’t match their ink with their pens, right? 😀

Reviews coming soon, of course. 🙂

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