Tag: knox pen

Review: Knox Galileo

Knox Galileo

To cap off my series of reviews on Knox pens, I tried out the Galileo from Everything Calligraphy. To be honest, it looked a lot like the Avicenna that I had to see them side by side to see the difference. There were a few. The Galileo is smaller, has a more streamlined design. The trims are thinner and flush against the barrel. The body is also metal, like the Avicenna and the Aristotle, although it’s lighter and smaller than either pens.

Below is a side-by-side comparison of the two pens (Galileo on top, Avicenna on the bottom). The form factor is very similar. The clip on the Galileo is pretty nice, it has this shape that makes it easier to clip it through your pocket or pen case. Like the Avicenna and Aristotle, the clip on the Galileo is functional and feels sturdy.

Knox Galileo

After playing with two pen models that have very conservative colors, I’m kinda happy for the pop of colors on the Galileo pens sent to me.

Knox Galileo

That’s pretty refreshing. 🙂 Like the other two models, this pen has a very comfortably-sized section. Why can’t all pens have sections this comfortable and practical? Also…two-toned nibs! ^_^ Yaaas. It makes a difference for me, aesthetically speaking. Here’s another look at that nib.

Knox Galileo

I noticed that the medium nib isn’t two-toned, though. I guess it’s random? I dunno. Anyway, in terms of performance, it’s also basically identical with the Avicenna (click here to watch the writing sample). It’s a basic, iridium-point steel nib. I like that it’s smooth and writes wet out of the box, although it has a small sweet spot and slightly rotating your grip can cause the pen to skip a little.

Overall, at P799, it’s a pretty decent writer. Those who want to get their feet wet with writing with a fountain pen would enjoy this. Affordable, no-frills, and works right out of the box.

The Knox Galileo is available at Everything Calligraphy.

DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a paid post.

Review: Knox Aristotle

Knox Aristotle

Here’s another pen from Everything Calligraphy, the Knox Aristotle. It’s at the same price point of the Knox Avicenna, another budget-friendly pen. I kinda like the form factor of this pen. The torpedo shape is pretty nice. I’m not sure if there are other colors but the ones sent to me are pretty conservative.

Knox Aristotle

I believe the nib is practically the same across all the three Knox pens. The color, etching, and writing experience are pretty much the same. I hope someday they come up with two-toned nibs so that it fits the aesthetics of the pen better. I like that the trims of the pen are simple and, like the Avicenna, it’s a very conservative-looking pen. It can sit on a desk in an office or in a student’s pen case; it looks nice.

Knox Aristotle

I really love that these Knox pens have comfortably-sized sections. Small sections can be quite bothersome for long writing because you’re practically feeling the threads while you write. This one’s pretty comfortable to hold. The metal body gives it some heft but it’s not uncomfortable or tiring. The cap can be posted, but it’s top-heavy when you do so. Also, I’m uncomfortable with posting it because it might scratch the finish of the barrel.

The clip is squarish and functional. You can actually use it to clip the pen, it’s not too stiff and it feels securely attached to the cap.

Like the Avicenna, I’m glad that this one also wrote well right out of the box. Don’t you love it when affordable pens write without hard-starting, skipping, or scratchiness? I know I do. ^_^ I noticed these steel nibbed pens can be quite unforgiving to my hand rotations, though. Slight rotations can make it skip.

All in all, it’s good value for money. These German iridium point nibs have always performed well for me, and I’m pretty happy with my current pens that use them.

Knox Aristotle is available at Everything Calligraphy.

DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a paid post.

Review: Knox Avicenna

The wonderful people at Everything Calligraphy sent me a batch of new pens to try out and review. It’s pretty interesting, these new pens that they sent. I have to admit that I’ve never really heard of them before. The brand Knox is completely unfamiliar to me. So I was curious about what they looked like and how they wrote.

This pen I’m going to review today is the Knox Avicenna. My first impression when I opened the small and thin box that it came in was that it kinda felt like one of those Nemosine pens. In fact, the other models of Knox pens look a bit like the other models of Nemosine pens too. This one feels lighter than the Fission, though.

Review: Knox Avicenna

The body of the pen is made of metal, but it’s not too heavy. Perhaps it’s because it’s smaller in size than the Nemosine Fission. It’s a very simple-looking pen with a comfortable plastic section.

Review: Knox Avicenna

I find it very presentable. The pen’s price point puts it as an entry level pen, and as entry level pens go, I like that this pen’s design is not tacky at all. It’s not screaming “Look at me! Look at me!”

Review: Knox Avicenna

The chrome trims are simple and they don’t stand out. The colors are conservative and not too crazy-looking. The nib is steel but gold-colored, and that is a bit of an irritation for me, because it doesn’t match the trim. A two-toned nib would’ve been acceptable, or just a plain chrome-colored nib.

Review: Knox Avicenna

The cap takes a firm tug to pull off. It can be posted but it makes the pen top-heavy when posted. The clip is actually pretty functional. The pen uses a converter (included in the box). Here are a few close up shots of the pen’s details. I like the simple etchings and filigrees on the nib.

Review: Knox Avicenna         Review: Knox Avicenna

Review: Knox Avicenna         Review: Knox Avicenna

I was pleasantly surprised that the nib worked right out of the box. Unlike many steel-nibbed budget pens, this actually has a bit of springiness to it. It reminded me of how my old Ohto Poche used to write. This very slight springiness makes it pleasant to write with. As far as steel nibs go, this one’s pretty good. It’s not hard as a nail, which is a relief. Check out the video of the writing sample below.


Overall, I liked how the pen wrote. It was smooth, sufficiently wet, and a bit springy. It gives you the feeling that you’re writing with something soft, making your pen glide on paper. It’s super friendly on the budget, and is a good pen for daily writing. If you’re on a tight budget and you want something that writes well and looks simple, this pen offers good value for money.

The Knox Avicenna is available at Everything Calligraphy for P799.

Disclaimer: This is NOT a paid post.