Tag: leather pen case

How to Make a Pen Case Divider

There are a lot of great leather pen cases out there but not many of them have individual dividers. This is of course important because pens can rub against each other while inside the pen case and they might get scratched. So one of the members of FPN-P gave me some tips on how to make my own divider and I tried it today. The result is quite satisfactory, although not perfect yet because I don’t have the proper tools. I think it would be better to attempt this with tailor’s shears rather than a small pair of scissors like I did. That would prevent the cloth from fraying in the edges. Anyway, here’s a simple tutorial.

Materials:
1 Piece of cardboard that’s not too thick but not too thin
A small square of velvet cloth
Contact cement
Ruler and pencil

1. Make a pattern for your divider. I like my divider to not take up so much space in the case because I’m going to put bigger pens in it. So I opted for a T-shaped pattern.

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Be sure to measure the pattern according to your pen case, and that the divider will be shorter than the interior of your case. This is to make sure that the pens will be easier to pull out.

2. Measure out a square of velvet to cover both the back and the front of your pattern plus a little extra on the edges.

3. Next, I glued the middle part together so it becomes like a letter T.

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4. Slather the cardboard pattern with contact cement. I put the rugby on the front first, applying it with a brush. Then glue the cardboard onto the velvet fabric, making sure that the fabric is not wrinkled. Then when the front is done, apply contact cement on the back and wrap the remainder of the fabric.

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5. Sew the two ends of the divider shut. I’m not sure if you can see it here but I ran out of black thread so I used brown instead ¬†haha. Lazy. After sewing the two ends of the divider, cut off the excess fabric as close to the stitch as possible. Take a candle and very carefully seal the excess fabric by burning the ends.

Leave the divider out for a while to get the rugby smell out of it. The result is quite effective. Not bad for a first try. ūüôā

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The divider is partially pushed in. It’s about an inch shorter than the case.

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Bespoke Leather Pen Case from Alunsina

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Last year I asked Alunsina Handbound Books to make me a leather pen case. I didn’t want anything too flashy, I just wanted a safe way to carry my pens around and pull them out faster. I wanted to try an alternative to my usual pen wrap. I sent them an example of the case that I prefer and then just waited for them to finish. I realize that I placed my order at a bad time because the end of the year is a very busy time for them. So, a¬†few days ago they sent me what I ordered for.

I liked it a lot, though the pen slots were initially a tight fit for most my pens. Then I realized that I needed to stretch the leather slots a bit by actually pushing a Sharpie through them. That seemed to do the trick, though it still doesn’t fit my bigger pens like the Bexley and the Micarta. The others have no problem fitting.

It has a space to fit in one jotter notebook, but I realized that since the outer leather is thick and holds its shape, I can use the space for the notebook as an extra space for my other pens. It can fit 7 pens (4 in the slots and 3 in the grooves between them). Actually, you can fit in 9 if you use the leftmost and rightmost grooves too. I used those grooves for my Parker 51 pencil and my Parker 45 Harlequin ballpoint pen. The thick leather holds its shape and holds all the pens in place.

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The size of the whole case is about an in or so longer than Kislap, but it’s small enough to fit comfortably in my bag.

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Continue reading “Bespoke Leather Pen Case from Alunsina”

Review: Elias Journals and Pen Case

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For people who love to write, finding decent notebooks is a must. One of my friends (Keshia) recommended Elias notebooks to me, and of course I had to try it out. I must say I am happy I did! this happy bundle was delivered by Xend to our house this afternoon.

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My first impression on the journal is that it looks very presentable. The leather cover is very pleasant to touch. It’s genuine leather and it’s very soft and supple. Almost like velvet. Smells awesome too! I’m not ashamed to say that I’m a notebook huffer, and this notebook is very huff-worthy. The smell of leather and paper is ohhhh sooooo gooood. The leather cover is thick and the bindings looks very secured. I bought a large and small journal, the one in the photo above is 5.4 x 8 inches with 88 sheets of unlined paper.

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Yes, it actually is as soft as it looks. The notebook initially has some difficulties laying down flat, but it looks like something that will come naturally as you open it more often.

Update: While the journals don’t lay flat, it opens up quite easily as you use it more often. I myself have softened the spine by fully opening the notebook. In other words, binuksan ko ng maiging-maigi. Don’t be afraid, the spine can take it.

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There’s a little pocket at the back where you can store notes and whatnots, and it had two slips of paper inside.¬†These are neatly printed sheets; one explains how to take care of the leather, the other explains the origins of the notebook’s name. Elias is from the character in Jose Rizal’s novels Noli Me Tangere. I think that providing a glimpse of the notebook’s backstory is a very nice touch.

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Now, on to the paper.¬† Continue reading “Review: Elias Journals and Pen Case”